Risky Business #524 -- Huawei CFO arrested, US Government dumps on Equifax

PLUS: Australia's surveillance bill becomes law...

This is the last weekly Risky Business podcast for 2018. We’ll be posting a Soap Box edition early next week then going on break until January 9.

In this week’s show Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discuss the week’s security news:

  • Huawei’s CFO arrested over sanctions violations
  • BT in the UK removes Huawei equipment from 4G network
  • Australia passes controversial surveillance law
  • US House Oversight Committee blasts Equifax in scathing report
  • Bloomberg plays word-games on Super Micro story
  • MOAR

This week’s show is sponsored by Bugcrowd. In this week’s sponsor interview Bugcrowd’s CTO and founder Casey Ellis tells us why his company is launching “pay for effort” products to run alongside bounty programs.

Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Snake Oilers 8 part 2: Forticode's Cipherise, device features from Exabeam and SentinelOne on "active EDR"

The final Snake Oilers podcast for 2018...

Snake Oilers is the podcast where we get a bunch of vendors together to pitch their stuff – they all pay to participate, just so you know – and today we’re going to hear three pitches from tech companies: one from Forticode, one from Exabeam and one from SentinelOne.

That’s right, we talk to vendors to get their best pitches so you don’t have to!

Forticode joins us to pitch its Cipherise platform – applied PKI wrapped into a slick mobile platform that helps large organisations authenticate their users, and helps their users authenticate them.

Exabeam will be talking about how they’re doing more device analytics in their SIEM platform and SentinelOne will be talking about how they differentiate themselves in the highly competitive EDR space.

Links to all of these companies are below.

Risky Business #523 -- So many breaches

Plus all the other news...

This week’s show features Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discussing the week’s security news, including:

  • The Marriott, Quora, Dell and Sky Brazil data breaches
  • Kashoggi associate to sue NSO Group
  • Australia’s AA Bill set to pass
  • NZ give Huawei the boot
  • AutoCAD malware targets key verticals
  • Republicans’ 2018 campaign hacked
  • Czech government blames Russia for intrusions into key systems
  • Horror-show bug in Kubernetes

This week’s show is brought to you by Duo Security, big thanks to Duo for that! In this week’s sponsor interview we’ll be chatting with Duo Security’s very own Dave Lewis about some Beyond Corp stuff. Beyond Corp is the enterprise computing model of the future and Dave will be along after this week’s news to talk about some of its finer points.

Links to everything that we discussed are below. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Snake Oilers 8 part 1: Rapid7's InsightAppSec, WhiteSource and Virus Total Enterprise

Roll up, roll up! This is miracle stuff!

This is the first part of our final Snake Oilers edition for 2018.

Snake OIlers, for people don’t know it, is the podcast where vendors pay to come on to the show to promote their wares. This series actually turned out to be way more popular than we expected. People quite like listening to security companies actually explaining what they do in clear terms.

We have six vendors participating in this last round of Snake Oilers for the year – we’ve split the podcast into two podcasts containing three vendor pitches each, and in this part you’ll be hearing pitches from Rapid7, WhiteSource and Chronicle.

  • Dan Kuykendall of Rapid7 talks InsightAppSec, its DAST solution.
  • David Habusha of WhiteSource talks software composition analysis
  • Brandon Levene of Chronicle on VirusTotal Enterprise

Part two is up next week!

Risky Business #522 -- Alex Stamos co-hosts the show, reflects on Snowden disclosures

All the week's security news, plus a look back on the Edward Snowden disclosures five years later...

We’ve got a slightly different edition of the show this week – Alex Stamos is filling in for Adam Boileau this week in the news slot.

Most of you know him as Facebook’s recently departed chief security officer. Alex also served as the CSO at Yahoo for a time, but his security career stretches back a long way. He co-founded iSEC Partners back in 2004, and before that he did some time with @Stake.

The @Stake mafia is everywhere.

These days Alex is an adjunct professor at Stanford University. He joined me to talk about the week’s security news, as well as to have a chat about the Edward Snowden disclosures, five years on.

This week’s show is brought to you by Thinkst Canary, big thanks to them for that. And instead of one of their staff being on the show this week in the sponsor chair, they asked me to interview this week’s sponsor guest, their customer, Mike Ruth, a security engineer with Cruise Automation.

Mike did a presentation at a conference called QCon recently all about automating the deployment of canary tokens at scale using some nifty CI/CD tricks. He’ll be joining us after the news to tell us all about that.

Items discussed in this week’s news:

  • NSO Group busted to selling to Saudi Arabia
  • NSO malware targets Mexican journalists
  • Edward Snowden claims NSO connection in Khashoggi case
  • Australia’s AA Bill latest
  • npm supply-chain attack targets Bitcoiners
  • Guardian reports Manafort met Assange, denials, lawsuits flying already
  • UK parliament seizes Facebook documents
  • Uber fined over 2016 breach coverup
  • UK cops decline to charge bug reporter
  • USPS finally fixes data exposure after Krebs intervention
  • Rowhammer attack bypasses ECC protections
  • Bloomberg is investigating its own reporting on Supermicro
  • Magecart is everywhere
  • Google, Mozilla plan browser access to file systems

Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Alex on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Biz Soap Box: MITRE ATT&CK Matrix, misconfigured security controls, attack sim and more!

Some time with Stephan Chenette, co-founder, AttackIQ...

The Soap Box podcast series is a wholly sponsored podcast series we do here at Risky.Biz – vendors pay to participate. This Soap Box edition is brought to you by AttackIQ.

AttackIQ is a five-year-old company that makes an attack simulation platform. The idea is you agitate a network with suspicious traffic and activities, then measure what the response looks like on the other side. As you’ll hear, Stephan argues this is a better way to test your controls than trying to do it after an incident has been and gone.

Mostly people are using it to verify the effectiveness of their security controls. They already have endpoint security software, IDS, various monitoring bits and pieces, but quite often this stuff just isn’t tuned right. So, you throw some attack traffic and behaviour at your systems and see what bubbles up

One piece of work that has been absolutely vital to AttackIQ’s success is the MITRE ATT&CK Matrix. Like AttackIQ, the ATT&CK Matrix has been around for five years.

Stephan Chenette is AttackIQ’s CTO and he joined me to talk all about how they’re trying to use the ATT&CK Matrix to drive their whole outlook, and, conversely, how they’re spending time talking to MITRE about where the whole thing is going.

Risky Business #521 -- Bears everywhere

Renewed Russian activity and a bad month for Julian Assange, Facebook and Bitcoin...

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • Cozy Bear is back, Fancy Bear has new tooling
  • Russian government wants DNC lawsuit thrown out
  • Cyber Command submitting samples to VirusTotal
  • Google BGP shenanigans
  • Australian/China Telecom BGP shenanigans
  • All the recent Facebook drama
  • More speculative execution bugs
  • Julian Assange likely to be charged
  • Vault7 leaker facing new charges
  • Phineas Fisher investigation abandoned
  • Bitcoin/Tether link probed by DoJ, btc in free-fall
  • MUCH MOAR

This week’s show is brought to you by Proofpoint.

Sherrod DeGrippo, Proofpoint’s director of threat research and detection is this week’s sponsor guest. Surprisingly, she tells us that ransomware via email is a dead duck.

Links to everything that we discussed are below. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #520 -- Tanya Janca talks security in the curriculum

PLUS all the week's security news with Adam Boileau...

We’ve got a great podcast for you this week. Tanya Janca will be talking about some volunteer work she’s been doing with a Canadian government panel on getting security content into children’s school curriculums.

In this week’s sponsor interview we’ll be talking with Ferruh Mavituna of Netsparker.

They launched Netsparker Cloud a while ago so now they have some decent telemetry I wanted to ask Ferruh what he’s found surprising now he’s sitting on a mountain of scan results. The types of bugs being turned up aren’t really a surprise, but the extent to which old software is a problem was actually pretty surprising to him. He knew it was bad, he says, but he didn’t know it’s this bad.

Adam Boileau, as usual, joins the show this week to talk about all the week’s security news:

  • More Chinese MSS officers indicted by the US DoJ
  • ASD chief speaks publicly on 5G Huawei ban
  • China playing funny buggers with BGP
  • Russia is still messing with the US during the midterms
  • Facebook boots more Iranian influence pages
  • New privacy features in Signal
  • Plus much, much more!

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Biz Soap Box: Duo's Olabode Anise recap's his Black Hat talk on Twitter bots

Olabode gives us a rundown on the Twitter bot ecosystem...

Soap Box is the wholly sponsored podcast series we do where vendors pay to participate. They sometimes want to talk about their products, other times they want to talk about general ecosystem stuff, other times they want to talk about research they’ve done.

And that’s what’s happening today! Olabode Anise is a data scientist at Duo Security. He and his colleague Jordan Wright put together a talk for Black Hat this year all about Twitter bots. It was called Don’t @ me, hunting Twitter bots at scale.

As you’ll hear, finding bots on Twitter at scale isn’t that hard, but doing so with 100% confidence isn’t as easy as you’d think.

You can check out a blog post from Olabode in the show note below.

Risky Business #519 -- '90s IRC war between US and Russia intensifies

This is serious. If Russia doesn't stop it, someone's mother will get a phone call!

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • CYBERCOM doxing Russian operators. No, really.
  • Arrest over Russian midterm info-op
  • Bloomberg dumpster fire is now a tyre fire
  • Equifax insider sentenced for insider trading
  • Twitter releases bot dataset
  • Saudi insider responsible for 2015 Twitter breach
  • Trisis/Triton now linked to Russia
  • Kaspersky doxes NSA op
  • Risky Business cited by Senate Estimates, AA Bill faces possible delay
  • Much, much more!

This week’s show is sponsored by Cylance, and this week’s sponsor interview is with Josh Lemos.

That’s an interesting chat – Cylance has succeeded in applying machine learning to classifying binaries, but what next? Where does it make sense to apply machine learning next, from their point of view? As you’ll hear, a binary classifier is one thing, but applying ML to something like endpoint detection and response or network traffic is actually a lot more complicated.

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #518 -- "Russian Cambridge Analytica" booted off Facebook after token hack

Coincidence? Maybe. Probably not tho... :/

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • More info on the Facebook token hack
  • Facebook boots “Russian Cambridge Analytica” off platform
  • Chinese MSS officer extradited to USA after being lured to Belgium
  • NotPetya linked to Sandworm crew
  • Czech intelligence services kill Hezbollah APT
  • Pentagon travel records pwnt
  • No, Khashoggi’s Apple Watch didn’t record his death
  • Apple takes aim at Australia’s AA Bill
  • US voter records for sale in hack forums
  • PHP 5 support ends soon, netpocalypse to commence shortly afterward
  • The world’s most hilarious libssh bug
  • PLUS MOAR

This week’s show is sponsored by Senrio.

Senrio is best known for doing IoT identification, classification, visualisation and anomaly detection, but they’ve now applied the same approach to general IT. Stephen will be along later in the show to talk about what they’ve been able to engineer here. I’ve actually been working with them on this (in a limited capacity) for a few months and it’s very interesting stuff.

So yeah he’s talking about a feature release, then he’ll be releasing some open source tooling that mine your network metadata and spot interactive shells in your environment, which is handy, and then he’s going to preview some free training he’s doing with some other very well respected security people in New York soon.

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #517 -- Bloomberg's dumpster fire lights up infosec

Bloomberg has previously published false, made-up security stories about imaginary things that didn't happen...

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • Bloomberg’s shaky, disputed report on hardware back doors
  • A look back on other false reports about imaginary incidents published by Bloomberg
  • GRU operations doxed by GCHQ
  • DOJ charges Russian intelligence officers
  • APT crews targeting MSPs
  • Google+ API exposure the final straw
  • Enterprise TLS interception gear is woefully insecure

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business Feature: Named source in "The Big Hack" has doubts about the story

"Big Hack" technical source Joe Fitzpatrick has concerns about Bloomberg's reporting...

In this podcast hardware security expert Joe Fitzpatrick, a named source in Bloomberg’s “Big Hack” piece, explains why he felt uncomfortable reading the story when it was published.

He also provided Risky.Biz with emails he sent to Bloomberg, prior to the story’s publication, that said the hardware back-dooring the article described “didn’t make sense”.

Risky Biz Soap Box: What's up with the ZDI these days?

A Trend Micro Soap Box edition...

The Soap Box podcast series is a wholly sponsored podcast series we do here at Risky.Biz – vendors pay to participate. This soap box edition is brought to you by Trend Micro.

And in this edition we’re speaking with Dustin Childs who works for the Zero Day Initiative. ZDI is the entity responsible for the pwn2own competition. But not just that – they’ve been buying bugs since before it was cool. Everything from enterprise software, to linux bugs.. whatever. You find it, they’ll buy it.

Trend Micro actually owns the ZDI, and there’s a story right there in how that came to pass… but you know what? Trend seems to really be behind the ZDI program.

As you’ll hear, the original idea behind ZDI when it was a TippingPoint thing was so they could write IDS signatures for vulnerabilities that ZDI unearthed. We know today that spinning up sigs for bugs you’re paying for isn’t really a winning strategy for picking up 0day attempts against your computers, so, the question becomes, what do you do with a program like ZDI when you’re Trend Micro?

As it turns out, you do two things with it – there’s the marketing side, but there’s also the constant stream of exploit submissions that come in handy when you’re making endpoint security software.

We’ll also be hearing from Eric Skinner in this podcast – he’s Trend’s VP of Solution Marketing at Trend. Trend is pushing a major release of its endpoint security software and he’s along to spruik that a bit, as well as chiming in on some of the ZDI stuff.

[CORRECTED] Risky Business feature: A podcast on Bloomberg's absolutely wild Supermicro story

The hardware subversion methods described in the Bloomberg story are plausible...

In this podcast I interview Stephen Ridley about Bloomberg’s blockbuster – but so far uncorroborated – story about possible hardware supply chain subversion by the Chinese government.

I also lay out some facts I’ve learned since the story broke.

[CORRECTED] I’ve added a correction to this podcast because the only source I could turn up who would corroborate the Bloomberg piece has retracted their claims.

This is a source who has provided me with good information in the past, I’ve known them for about 15 years and they’re very well plugged in. They showed me photos they said were from a teardown of a supermicro motherboard. These photos showed an unlabelled integrated circuit the source said was likely a hardware back door.

Further, the source said there were other problems with the Supermicro gear, including vulnerable firmware and security functions that just didn’t work properly.

Now the source says the photos were from different equipment, not their teardown of the Supermicro gear, and that they did not find hardware back doors on the Supermicro equipment.

So basically that source’s credibility with me is pretty shot right now, and the best I can do is retract my repetition of the source’s claim that they had verified backdoors in the Supermicro equipment.

Risky Business #516 -- The Facebook breach, e2e VOIP court verdict, Uber's record fine and more

An insanely busy news week recapped on Risky.Biz...

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • Facebook breach impacts 50m accounts
  • US courts deny authorities’ attempted FB messenger wiretap
  • Uber fined $148m for nondisclosure of 2016 breach
  • Fancy Bear-linked UEFI malware appears in wild
  • UK Conservative party conference app leaks like sieve
  • Twitter bans distribution of “hacked material”
  • VPNFilter botnet gets more capabilities
  • Duo arrested over $14m cryptocurrency SIM-swap heist
  • MOAR

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #515 -- NSA staffer at centre of Kaspersky scandal jailed

Nghia Hoang Pho's unsanctioned homework results in 66-month sentence...

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • Former NSA staffer gets 66 months over incident at heart of Kaspersky scandal
  • Zoho has a very bad week
  • Telco lobby group raises some legit concerns over Australia’s “anti-encryption” legislation
  • Twitter API leaks DMs
  • Equifax fined by UK
  • Yubikey 5 enables passwordless Windows logins
  • Privacy International has an aneurism
  • NSS Labs launches antitrust suit against security software makers
  • MOAR

This week’s show is brought to you by Rapid7.

Jen Andre is this week’s sponsor guest. She was the founder of Komand, which was a security automation and orchestration company but is now a part of Rapid7 as of about mid way through last year. I spoke to Jen a bit about how she came to start Komand and where the security automation and orchestration discipline is at right now.

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Biz Soap Box: Yubico launches Yubikey 5, ushers in passwordless Windows logins

FIDO2 over NFC with Yubikey 5 on Windows FTW OMG!

Soap Box is the wholly sponsored podcast series we do where vendors pay to participate.

Our guest in this edition is Jerrod Chong, the SVP of product at Yubico, the makers of Yubikeys. We were originally going to publish this Soap Box with Yubico a few weeks ago, but we delayed it for a very good reason.

This podcast is going out at the same time as a press release from Yubico – they’re releasing the Yubikey 5, and it’s a very significant update.

Regular listeners would have heard me talk about seeing Yubico’s booth at Black Hat – it was like a mosh pit, and I think there are two reasons for that. Firstly, they were giving away keys, (haha) but secondly, they were demonstrating FIDO2 Windows logins over NFC.

With the launch of the Yubikey 5, Yubico has actually delivered passwordless logins for Windows networks. You can do tap only via NFC, tap and pin via NFC, or you can roll old school with USB.

So, Jerrod Chong joined me for this conversation. We talk about the Yubikey 5, and more broadly about the future of authentication and authentication devices.

Risky Business feature: iOS exploits just got a lot more expensive

Pointer authentication kills old school ROP dead...

We’re going to be talking to two people in this podcast and the topic is, for the most part, the introduction of pointer authentication on the latest Apple iPhones. This is a development that flew under the radar of most of the infosec media and it’s significant because it is going to basically wipe out ROP exploits as we know them. There’s no such thing as a perfect mitigation, but Apple has leveraged some recent ARM features to really lock down their devices.

In addition to the pointer authentication suff they’ve also made some changes that will affect the ability of companies like Cellebrite to unlock phones. Again, this won’t kill unlocks completely, but in one release Apple really has made life a lot harder for people in the offence game.

This will eventually have some consequences for the crypto debate. These devices are just getting more and more secure through some really cool engineering.

So we’ll be talking to Chris Wade about this, he’s the brain behind Corellium, an iOS emulator. His clients include everyone from exploit developers to the publishers of very popular iOS applications. If you want to back-test an app change on 15 different versions of iOS Corellium is the way to do that… or if you want to, you know, test your latest 0day it’s good for that, too.

Then we’re going to hear from Dr. Silvio Cesare of Infosect here in Oz. He’s going to talk about whether we might see similar mitigations on intel and weigh in on Apple’s changes.

Risky Business #514 -- New NSO Group report released and another State Department email breach. Drink!

PLUS US telcos in bid to become a consumer auth broker...

This edition of the show features Adam Boileau and Patrick Gray discussing the week’s security news:

  • Citizen Lab drops NSO Group report
  • “Weaponised Stuxnet” claims are idiotic
  • Another State Department email breach! Drink!
  • Dutch foil planned attack against Swiss Novichok lab
  • Mirai botnet authors working for FBI
  • US telcos want to be consumer auth brokers
  • US fails to extradite “Mr Bitcoin”
  • Much, much more

This week’s show is brought to you by Remediant. They make a just-in-time access solution for privileged account management (PAM), and we’re doing something a little different in this week’s sponsor interview.

Paul Lanzi of Remediant will be along, but so will Harry Perper of MITRE corporation. Harry’s pay-cheques say MITRE, but he’s been working on a NIST project. The National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) at NIST has been working on a project to provide guidance on the secure usage and management of privileged accounts. The so-called 1800-18 document is a practical guide and reference architecture for privileged account management and we’ll talk to both Harry and Paul about that after the news.

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.