Risky Business feature interview: Linux malware is booming, thanks to IoT

Hilary Louise interviews Emanuele Cozzi about recent Linux malware trends...

The widespread adoption of smart and IoT devices – everything from drones and security cameras to thermostats and routers, mean the developers of non-Windows-based malware have been pretty busy lately

In fact, there’s been an almost tenfold increase in the volume of these (ELF) samples submitted to Virus Total over the past two years. That’s according to a cohort of researchers from the Software and System Security group at French graduate school EURECOM, who set out in 2016 to develop an empirical study of non-Windows malware.

They downloaded hundreds of daily candidate samples from Virus Total for a year, resulting in a dataset of more than 10,000 binaries and a tool called Padawan, an automated framework for dynamic analysis of non-Windows malware.

The researchers presented findings earlier this year at the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, and more recently at reverse engineering conference RECon in Montreal. Risky Business contributor Hilary Louise recently caught up over the phone with France-based EURECOM doctoral student Emanuele Cozzi who says the land of Linux-type malware analysis is a bit of a nascent field.

Risky Business #511 -- Australia, Japan to ban Huawei, Struts drama, DNC lols and more

All the week's news, plus a chat with Zane Lackey...

We’re going to stick with the revised format this week – we’re going long on news with Adam, then diving right in to the sponsor interview with Zane Lackey of Signal Sciences.

A bunch of you heard my long form, Soap Box interview with Zane from a few weeks back. We’re extending that interview out a bit in this week’s interview. Zane will be outlining what he thinks needs to change in DevSecOps tooling and workflow for things to really work nicely – it’s just a solid 12 minutes of good thinking and advice, that interview, so do stick around for it.

Adam Boileau will join the show to recap the week’s news:

  • Australia and Japan to ban Huawei from their 5G builds
  • Struts bug: Big deal or meh?
  • Voting machine maker ES&S rebuked by researchers AND US gov
  • The DNC phish that wasn’t
  • Recapping Andy Greenberg’s Maersk/Notpetya coverage
  • Instagram adds real 2FA
  • Windows privesc 0day on teh twittarz
  • T-Mobile pwned harder than it initially admitted
  • Log in to Windows with Google accounts
  • Some hilarious Lazarus group shenanigans
  • Much, much more

Links to everything that we discussed are below, including the discussions that were edited out. (That’s why there are extras.) You can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Snake Oilers 7 part 1: Rapid7 on changes to InsightVM, ITProTV on online training

InsightVM picks up patching automation, ITProTV on training at scale!

We’ve got two vendors pitching their wares in this edition of Snake Oilers. First up we’re talking to Rapid7 about its vulnerability scanning and management software. They’ve made some changes and they’ve got a couple more coming. This is bread and butter infosec stuff.

Then we’re going to hear from the team at ITProTV. They’re a video-based online training site, pitching themselves as like a Netflix but for online training. Instead of instructor-led training, they try to make stuff less dry – half hour training videos with two instructors on all sorts of topics.

The online training video sector is just booming right now, and ITProTV’s co-founder and “edutainer” Don Pezet will be along to walk through all of that.

Both of these companies are tracking enquiries originating from the podcast, so please do use the URLs in the show notes below if you’re interested in learning more.

Risky Business feature interview: Bob Lord, CSO, Democratic National Committee

The man who hid the server! The man who hid the server!!

In this podcast you’ll hear an interview I did with Bob Lord, the Chief Security Officer for the Democratic National Committee, the DNC. Bob has previously served as the CISOs for both Yahoo and Twitter, before spending some time in vendorland with Rapid7 as their CISO in residence.

The state-sponsored attack against the DNC is without doubt the most politically consequential data theft event the planet has ever witnessed. It trumped both the Manning/Wikileaks disclosures and “climategate” in terms of impact, and indeed to a large degree the fallout of the DNC hack is still ongoing.

So, I wanted to bring Bob in to talk about his job.

The DNC isn’t a large organisation, in a head office sense. They have about 200 core staff members, but as you’ll hear, a political organisation’s IT setup is pretty atypical. So Bob and I mostly just spoke about how one handles security for an organisation like the DNC.

Risky Business #510 -- Hacky hack hack

All the week's news with Adam Boileau plus Lauren Pearl in the sponsor chair...

On this week’s show we’ll be running through the week’s security news, then diving right on in to a sponsor interview with Lauren Pearl of Trail of Bits. She’s joining us to talk about something Trail of Bits have been up to lately: adding features to open source software – and auditing open source software – on behalf of its customers.

I do have a feature interview this week, but it’s a long one so I’ll be breaking that out in to a separate podcast. It’s a nice long chat with Bob Lord, the CSO for the Democratic National Committee. You know, the guy who hid “the server”.

The news we’re covering this week:

  • Melbourne teenager hacky-hack hacks Apple
  • Facebook nukes Iranian and RU influence ops
  • Report: Sealed court order seeks Facebook Messenger E2E intercept
  • USG ditches PPD-20 equities process
  • A look at “Intrusion Truth” CN operator doxing ring
  • Microsoft kills RU phishing domains
  • PLUS MOAR

Links to everything are below, and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business feature: Adam Boileau recaps Black Hat and DEF CON

A walk through the talks Adam attended in Las Vegas...

In this breakout podcast we chat with Adam Boileau about the talks that caught his attention in Las Vegas a couple of weeks ago. The Black Hat PR team were kind enough to credential Adam for the con so he could go and see a few talks with his Risky Business hat on.

I was at Black Hat but spent most of my time running around like a headless chicken. These days Vegas week for me is mostly about locking in the next year’s sponsorships, as well as catching up with friends I hardly ever see. The good news is the sponsorship side is done. We’re almost sold out across the weekly show, Snake Oilers and Soap Box until 2020. The bad news is I didn’t really get to go to any talks.

But that’s ok, because Adam went to both Black Hat and DEF CON and he joined me to talk about the highlights from his point of view. This was his first trip to the Vegas cons since 2005, and agreed with me that the content this year was actually pretty bloody good.

I’ve done my best to assemble links to everything Adam talks about into a list below:

Risky Business #509 -- Just the usual mayhem and ownage

A look at recent infosec news...

Adam and I have just returned from Black Hat and DEF CON in Las Vegas, so in this week’s show we’re going to have a look at the infosec news we missed over last couple of weeks. We did plan to recap Black Hat in this podcast, but we’ve wound up a bit short on space so I’m busting that out into a separate podcast that I’ll publish on Monday. So this podcast will just be a discussion around news plus a sponsor interview.

The news we’re covering:

  • Australia’s new surveillance/”anti-encryption” laws
  • Intel SGX vulnerability research
  • Taiwan Semiconductor WannaCry woes
  • Details on CYBERCOM op against ISIS
  • Reddit pwnage
  • Bitcoin investor sues AT&T over $23m loss
  • FIN7 arrests
  • CIA’s loss of scores of China assets may have been hack-related
  • Massive ATM cashout and SWIFT attack hits Indian bank
  • Much, much more

Bugcrowd CTO Casey Ellis joins us in this week’s sponsor interview to talk about a few things – firstly, how some research presented at Black Hat by the team at Portswigger is a sign that serious research teams are using bounties to cash in on their serious security research. Then we’ll be talking about the Bugcrowd University initiative and a reboot of the disclose.io project.

Links to everything are below, and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #508 -- Special guest Greg Shipley of In-Q-Tel's Cyber Reboot

How a --nopayload flag in tcpdump could turbocharge machine learning...

On this week’s show we hear from Greg Shipley. Greg works at an initiative spun up by In-Q-Tel called Cyber Reboot. Its goal is to develop open source tools that can push things forward in security – things the private sector aren’t doing.

He’ll be telling us about some changes his colleagues have made to tcpdump, which, if they ever manage to get the changes adopted, could actually be quite useful to the security community.

This week’s show is brought to you by Duo Security! And Duo’s very own Dave Lewis will be joining us this week to talk about the roadblocks you might face if you’re trying to head down the BeyondCorp road to the deperimiterised nirvana!

Adam Boileau drops in to discuss the week’s news, including:

  • COSCO shipping ransomwared into oblivion
  • DHS warning on impending ERP attacks
  • Charges against SIM-swap cryptocurrency thief
  • Google’s “Shielded VMs”
  • Google’s launch of its own hardware security tokens
  • Master134 malvertising campaign
  • New Kronos version
  • NetSpectre attacks
  • Bluetooth bugs
  • Much, much more

Links to everything are below, and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Biz Soap Box: Zane Lackey of Signal Sciences talks DevOps

Zane talks about his upcoming O'Reilly book on DevOps...

What you’re about to hear is a long form interview with Zane Lackey, a former pentester turned director of security engineering for Etsy turned co-founder and CSO of Signal Sciences.

Signal Sciences can be broadly, kinda described as “next generation WAF”. If you do have a requirement for a waffy, raspy thing, then you absolutely need to check out Signal Sciences.

They give you visibility in to attacks against your applications, and even auto-blocking a bunch of them without that turning into a cascading horror-show.

Signal Sciences’ product has a really strong emphasis on assisting organisations who are running DevOps shops. And it makes sense, Zane’s key achievement at Etsy was managing the security of that company’s Devops transition.

He’s actually just written an O’Reilly book, Building a Modern Security Program. So, he joined me to talk about his book, what’s in it, about DevSecOps more generally, and about some new stuff Signal Sciences has been working on.

Risky Business #507 -- For Vlad

A monster news segment with Haroon Meer, news and announcements!

We didn’t have space to run a feature in this week’s show, mostly because we had three weeks of news to catch up on because of my holiday. Adam Boileau is away on a company retreat this week, so Haroon Meer is this week’s news guest.

We talk about:

  • The Russia indictment
  • Chrome now marks http sites as “not secure”
  • Julian Assange is close to being turfed out of his London digs
  • Microsoft’s midterm meddling misfire
  • Singapore loses 1.5m health records
  • Some cool research from Talos and Cyberark
  • Azimuth Security acquired by L3
  • The npm supply-chain attack
  • Chrome site isolation
  • And much more!

This week’s sponsor is ICEBRG. And ICEBRG just announced today that it’s been acquired by Gigamon, which is pretty big news for them. So we’ll spend a couple of minutes talking about that with ICEBRG’s Jason Rebholz. Then we’ll be talking to Justin Warner about a pretty cool Flash 0day they found hiding in a Microsoft Office document. That was some pretty cool work, and the attackers in that case did some pretty novel things in terms of keeping their payload away from prying eyes. Obviously they didn’t do a good enough job or we wouldn’t be talking about it, but there are some new techniques there, fun stuff.

*****NOTE: At one point I get Jason Rebholz’s name wrong. I call him Justin Rebholz by accident. Apologies for the error, Jason!

Risky Biz Soap Box: Cylance: Driving machine learning model development with threat research

Cylance director of threat research Chris Sestito joins Soap Box...

There’s no weekly show this week, I’m on a beach somewhere tropical right now and I prepared this one so we’d have something to run while I’m away. The Soap Box is one of our wholly sponsored podcasts here at Risky Biz HQ – vendors pay to come on to talk about what’s on their mind.

And this week we’ve got Cylance’s very own Chris Sestito joining us. He heads threat research for Cylance, the AV company.

Cylance is a relatively new company – they’ve been around about six years now – and regular listeners would have heard me credit them for almost singlehandedly shaking up the AV industry.

They built a machine learning model for detecting malware that was effective enough to actually challenge the incumbents, who until then, had a stranglehold on the market. Cylance’s fortunes rose further when it played an instrumental part in detecting and cleaning up malware used against the US office of personnel management, or OPM.

That was a big moment, because from there it seemed like all of a sudden EVERYONE was a machine learning company. I’m sure a lot of people listening to this podcast are so sick to death of hearing pitches from vendors about machine learning.

But the thing is, Cylance was built on machine learning and they are still 100%, 24-carat true believers. Chris Sestito joined me to talk about driving machine learning model development with threat research, dodgy machine learning marketing and more.

Snake Oilers 6 part 2: Proofpoint on cred phishing, Exabeam defines next-gen SIEM

Part two of the poorly-named June Snake Oilers edition...

Snake Oilers is a wholly sponsored podcast series we a few times a year here at Risky Biz HQ. The idea is we get a bunch of vendors together and they pitch their tech in a straightforward way. Less “stops advanced cyber threats” and more “here’s what our stuff does and how it works”.

You’re hearing this instead of a weekly show because I am currently on a beach somewhere tropical.

We’ve got two vendors in this edition of ‘Oilers: next-gen SIEM platform company Exabeam and email filtering giant Proofpoint.

Our sponsor guest from Proofpoint is Ryan Kalember. Ryan is the SVP of cybersecurity strategy at Proofpoint, and regular listeners would have heard him pop up here and there on other Risky Business podcasts.

Ryan knows an awful lot about email security and he’s joining us this week to talk about a few things. A big selling point he wants to hit home this week is that Proofpoint offers its clients dedicated IPs for their outbound mail servers. That means you won’t be blocked when someone else using the same IP for outbound mail starts sending spam. Believe it or not this is a thing that happens to users on other mail filtering platforms. From there Ryan spells out Proofpoint’s approach to combating credential phishing. Aaaaand we talk about other stuff too. We started off by talking about how some organisations are getting blocked because their filtering provider is sharing IPs between clients.

Exabeam also drops in to talk about what a next gen SIEM actually is. From day one Exabeam was a startup that meant business. As you’ll hear, they started off as a SIEM-helper, and they’ve gradually built out their product from there. Now they’re going after the established SIEM market – think Splunk, Arcsight, those types of products. Despite only being five years old, Exabeam has quickly established itself as a real player in the SIEM market.

And why not? They make a compelling argument that the most popular SIEM products have gone stale. Anu Yamanan is the VP of products at Exabeam and she’s here to explain the general pitch behind all next generation SIEM gear. The idea is to go beyond the event log and build a timeline of events that actually has context around it. SOC analysts, SIEM specialists and CSOs will be interested to hear what she has to say here.

Risky Business #506 -- How security teams can work with PR

Tell the world about all your great work!

On this week’s show we’re chatting with a PR pro who specialises in information security. Melanie Ensign currently works at Uber, but she also served as a security PR for Facebook and before that, AT&T. She drops in this week to talk about how you can work with the PR professionals in your organisation to help tell your security story to the wider world. She also has some great tips for infosec professionals who might be a bit nervous about dealing with journalists.

In this week’s sponsor interview we’re joined by Julian Fay, the CTO of Senetas.

Senetas has a long history of making layer 2 network encryptors, but they are branching out in all sorts of ways these days. One thing they’re doing now is working on approaches to network encryption that play nicely with software-defined WAN. The days of hauling all your network traffic back to a single choke point are numbered – Julian thinks in the near future you’ll have some sort of CPE device that actually implements different types of encryption on different types of traffic crossing your border. So, Senetas has actually built that gear and we’ll be hearing about why.

Adam Boileau joins the show to talk about the week’s security news:

  • Some very cool LTE research
  • Equifax manager charged with insider trading
  • Ticketmaster’s bad week
  • The US DoD’s very own app store
  • Weird, maybe, possibly-but-probably-not OPM-related fraud
  • MOAR Rowhammer stuff affecting ‘droid handsets

Links to everything are below, and you can follow Adam or Patrick on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #505 -- Sanger vs FireEye, Reality Winner cops a plea

PLUS: Microsoft pushes mandatory 2FA, property settlement hacks escalate and MOAR...

No feature interview in this week’s show, we go long on news instead. Adam Boileau joins the podcast to talk through the week’s infosec news, including:

  • Confusion reigns in David Sanger vs FireEye spat
  • Reality Winner pleads guilty
  • PEXA property settlement platform users fleeced
  • US Supreme Court decides location info requires a warrant
  • The Apple unlock bug that wasn’t

This week’s show is brought to you by Thinkst Canary. Thinkst’s very own Marco Slaviero joins us in this week’s sponsor segment to talk about how some vendors are derping out when it comes to creating needlessly complicated “deception platforms”.

Links to everything are below, and you can follow Adam or Patrick on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Snake Oilers 6 part 1: InsightIDR from Rapid7, whitelisting with Airlock Digital and testing your SOC personnel with AttackIQ

A round up from vendor land...

First up in this edition of Snake Oilers we speak with Rapid7. Listeners of the regular show would have heard me talk about their UserInsight software for years. That’s because I knew people who used it and they swore by it. UserInsight was user and entity behaviour analytics (UEBA) software that was massively ahead of its time. It was very good at spotting weird things happening on your network when it comes to dumped or compromised creds popping up in weird places.

Well, InsightIDR is basically where UserInsight wound up, and yeah, it’s morphed in to a product that’s half SIEM and half EDR.

Every Tom, Dick and Harriett seems to be offering EDR software these days, and every next-gen SIEM company is becoming more and more UEBA-centric, so what Rapid7 has created here is something in between. InsightIDR product manager Eric Sun will tell us all about it.

Next up we’ll hear the simplest pitch in this podcast, from Airlock Digital. They’re an Australian company that makes whitelisting software that’s actually useable. If your organisation has tried implementing whitelisting through Microsoft’s Applocker then you know how badly it sucks. These guys have created a simple but useable whitelisting solution.

I’ve been to the booth! I’ve seen the demo! Airlock Digital co-founder David Cottingham is our guest on their behalf. In addition to being a founder, David is also the author of the SANS course SEC480: which covers the ASD top 4 – number one on that list is whitelisting. He has experience in the federal government implementing whitelisting and after seeing just how badly other products suck, he and his mates founded Airlock Digital. So yeah, if you’re whitelist-curious or if you’re sick of dealing with Applocker, then you really, really should stick around for that one.

After that we’re checking in with Stephan Chenette of AttackIQ. They make attack simulation software, but in response to customer demand they’ve actually taken it to its logical extension - they’re now offering modules you can use to test your SOC staff, or, if you outsource, you can use these modules to test your MSSP. Throw some alerts at them and see what comes back – get scores for individual SOC operators. Hey, even if you ARE an MSSP you might want to use this software to see who to promote in your SOC. That’s interesting stuff.

Risky Business #504 -- Latest email frauds and changes to money muling

A chat with Australia's very own "huggable (former) fed" Alex Tilley...

On this week’s show we’re chatting with Alex Tilley. He’s with Secureworks in Australia these days, but before that he spent a big chunk of his career with the Australian Federal Police.

He did a presentation a few weeks back at the AusCERT conference all about what fraud crews are up to these days. He’ll be joining us to walk through how much damage West African crime groups are doing with compromised office 365 accounts. We also talk a bit about trends in money muling, because that game has really changed.

This week’s show is brought to you by Cylance, and in this week’s sponsor interview we’ll be chatting with Cylance’s very own Jim Walter about how ransomware hasn’t really gone anywhere, despite most of the tech press getting sick of writing about it.

Adam Boileau, as usual, joins us to talk about the week’s news, including:

  • The Vault7 guy is totally screwed
  • US Senate scuttles Trump’s plan to save ZTE
  • Chinese pwning satellite comms, telcos
  • Olympic Destroyer crew is back

Links to everything are below and you can follow Patrick and Adam on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #503 -- North Korean tech in the global supply chain

Nonproliferation expert Andrea Berger on DPRK's surprisingly global IT industry...

You might have noticed North Korea’s been in the news over the last couple of days. Well, we’re sticking with the theme – we’ve got a great feature interview for you this week with Andrea Berger. She’s a senior research associate at the US-based James Martin Centre for Nonproliferation Studies and the co-host of the Arms Control Wonk podcast. This week she speaks with Risky Business contributor Hilary Louise about a report the centre did into North Korea’s IT industry.

Yep, they have one, and you’ll be surprised by its scope and reach. That’s this week’s feature interview.

This week’s sponsor interview is with Signal Sciences co-founder and CEO Andrew Peterson. Andrew was at a Gartner event in DC last week, and I grabbed some time with him to talk about what’s new in DevSecOps, how people are applying various DevSecOps tools, and what the general awareness of good DevSecOps practices is out there. Andrew’s prior career was in development, not security. He and Zane Lackey worked together at Etsy and Signal Sciences was very much inspired by the work they both did there. Andrew says analysts are starting to understand that web application security isn’t something you drop on to a network in an appliance and things are actually changing.

Mark “Pipes” Piper is this week’s news guest. All the show links are below and you can follow Patrick, Pipes or Hilary, if that floats your boat.

Risky Business #502 -- Inside China's hacker scene

PLUS: Inside Micro$oft's pigopolist conspiracy to seize the people's repository...

On this week’s show we chat with Peter Wesley. Peter’s well known around the Australian security scene, but a few years back he relocated to China, where security is booming. He did a presentation at the AusCERT conference on the Gold Coast last week all about the Chinese hacker scene and security industry. He joins us in this week’s feature interview to tell us about how the Chinese scene evolved and what its current relationship with the Chinese government looks like.

This week’s sponsor interview is a cracker. We’ll be joined by Ryan Kalember, Senior Vice President of Strategy with Proofpoint, the email filtering company. Ryan is along to talk about a phenomenon the Proofpointers are very interested in – we’ve all heard of VIPs, but he’s here to talk about VAPs – Very Attacked People.

So much attacker behaviour these days is driven by email-based attacks, and the people getting hit the most with this sort of stuff might not be the ones you expect. Ryan joins us later on for that conversation in this week’s sponsor interview, with thanks to Proofpoint.

The show notes/links are below, and you can follow Adam or Patrick on Twitter if that’s your thing.

Risky Business #501 -- Trisis: signalling, deterrence or escalation?

PLUS: The FBI gets involved in the botnet takedown business in a very FBI way...

On this week’s show we’ll be talking about a whole bunch of stuff – the FBI taking down a botnet in a very FBI way, we go deep on the Trisis malware popping up in the US following America’s withdrawal from the so-called Iran agreement. We look at the latest in the crypto debate, breaches, bugs and more!

We’ll hear from Tom Uren of Australia’s Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) on the Trisis side of things. Tom worked in an interesting place in Australia’s defence department but these days spends his days think tanking for the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. He shares his thoughts on what it is Iran could be up to with Trisis.

This week’s show is brought to you by: Australia!

AustCYBER is a government-supported industry group here that is trying to get the Australian cybersecurity industry organised. There’s the VC-backed US model, the build a “cyber city” in the desert Israeli model, then there’s the Australia model, which is actually quite different. It’s much more about helping local startups win deals locally, then internationally, to get them on a path to profitability so they don’t have to sign the awful term sheets Australian VCs put in front of them.

Well, there’s more to it than that, but AustCYBER head honcho Michelle Price will be along in this week’s sponsor interview to walk us through what she’s trying to do for the Australian security industry and how foreign multinational companies can also benefit from that.

Risky Biz Soap Box: Kill your own meat with EclecticIQ

When the usual threat intelligence feeds aren't enough...

Soap Box is not our regular weekly show, it’s the monthly podcast here at Risky Biz HQ where vendors pay to come on to the show to talk about what it is they actually do.

Before EclecticIQ sponsored this edition, to be honest, I didn’t really know much about them. All I knew is that their positioning was very much around “threat intelligence,” which, as regular listeners would know, are two words that are usually followed by “derpa derpa” on the regular Risky Business podcast.

BUT! Here’s the thing. EclecticIQ don’t sell a “blinky light” box that receives a creaky feed of 12-month-old IOCs. They sell their solution to either massive organisations or very high risk organisations. They could be national cyber security centres, entire defence departments, very, very big enterprises; basically anyone that has an intelligence team and multiple constituent departments or agencies. They also play in ultra high risk sectors like defence contracting.

The EclecticIQ platform isn’t for small organisations. It really is for orgs that have dedicated, externally-focussed intelligence teams. Their play isn’t “we feed you threat intelligence,” it’s use our tooling to go get your own threat intelligence, develop a strategy for dealing with the resulting product then distributing the strategy that flows from that process out to the relevant people in your organisation. I like to think of this approach as “killing your own meat”. That’s what EclecticIQ is all about. They give you the shotgun and a map, the last known locations of the deer, a cool room and a bunch of cleavers. Delicious. Apologies to any vegetarians listening for that metaphor.

Joep Gommers is our guest. He is the founder and CEO of EclecticIQ. Prior to founding EclecticIQ, Joep served as Head of Global Collection and Global Intelligence Operations at iSIGHT Partners, which was, of course, acquired by FireEye. Joep joined me to talk about what it is that EclecticIQ actually does and the resulting conversation, I hope, will be interesting to anyone who wants to understand how Threat intelligence is developed and disseminated at scale.

There’s a link to EclecticIQ’s website below, and you can follow Joep Gommers on Twitter here.